Dandelion Days

Paperback, Zenith Books, revised edition, reprint 1966.



Book condition: fair.
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Price: £3.00
Description

 

The second volume in The Flax of Dream tetralogy.

 

The publisher’s blurb for the first edition (1922) is succinct: ‘This is the tale of a boy’s last terms at a public school, and it is in a sense a sequel to The Beautiful Years. It is the work of a very clever young writer whose nature essays have attracted the widest attention here and in America. It is utterly unlike the usual “school story”. It is a subtle and beautifully written study of character.’

 

Dandelion Days was rewritten in 1930, and it is the text of this edition that has been used in all subsequent reprints. The publisher’s blurb for this edition states: ‘Like The Beautiful Years, which was republished in 1929, this is an entirely new version of one of Mr Williamson’s earlier novels. It is, in fact, a new novel, as can be judged from the author’s remark in his dedication, that “only twenty-seven of the original sentences remain”. Dandelion Days is the second book of a series of four, of which The Beautiful Years is the first, and The Pathway – which made Mr Williamson famous throughout Europe and America – the last. It continues the story of Willie Maddison, whose childhood was the subject of The Beautiful Years. Here is the lovely downland country seen through the eyes of a boy whose experiences start him on the lonely path of poet and dreamer; his love and agony over Elsie Norman; his great friendship and sense of fun and adventure with Jack and others of “The Owl Club”; his mental stress and struggle against the tyranny of distasteful learning – in fact Willie Maddison is shown in process of being formed into the man whose ragic and ironic story ends with The Pathway. Dandelion Days is a book full of beauty and humour.

 

‘An earlier book of Mr Williamson’s, Tarka the Otter, won for him the Hawthornden Prize for 1927.’

 

(For a further consideration of the book and the background to the writing of it, see Anne Williamson's Dandelion Days.)